Chaim Vanek, MD

 Chaim Vanek, MD

Chaim Vanek, MD

Saturday, April 14, 2012
Recommended for: Dentists
OSOMS Courses
 
Note: To attend this session, please register for "OSOMS Symposium: Part 1"
 

 


Introduction to Osteoporosis Medications and their Oral Consequences
(Presented with Leon Assael, DMD, FACD, FICD) 
 
There are many efficacious medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. This lecture will provide an overview of the various agents (bisphosphonates, SERM's, anabolics, and new anti-resorptives) so that dental practitioners are familiar with the medications their patients may be taking for osteoporosis. Mechanisms of action and potential side effects of these therapies will be highlighted.

The patient with osteoporosis is undergoing a decade long series of pharmacologic interventions that modify bone loss and change the physiologic milieu of bone.  This has famously been associated with BRONJ (bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws).  The consequences of osteoporosis and its pharmacologic therapy have additional profound effects on oral health.  Diagnosis, prevention/dental treatment planning and management of the consequences of BRONJ and additional effects are reviewed in this session.

At the conclusion of the course, attendees will be able to:
  • Distinguish the various osteoporosis agents and the relevance to their own practice
  • Assess the pharmacologic management of osteoporosis in the dental patient and develop improved decision making with regard to dental treatment planning and execution of dental procedures

 

Dr. Vanek grew up in Los Angeles and received his medical training in Portland and Baltimore, Maryland. He certainly enjoys Portland more than any other city and is very happy to work at Oregon Health & Science University.  His clinical focus is in the area of osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency, and parathyroid gland disorders. He enjoys this area of endocrinology because so many great strides have been made in the past 20 years in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. For a long time it was thought that hip and spine fractures were a 'normal part of aging' but we now know that these conditions can be prevented or effectively treated with a variety of options.