James Howard, DDS

 James Howard, DDS

James Howard, DDS

Saturday, April 10, 2010
1. 8 am – 11 am
Recommended for: Assistants, Office Managers, Laboratory Technicians
 
2. 1:30 pm -4:30 pm
Recommended for: Dentists, Hygienists
 
ODA Courses
3 CE Credits each
 
 
 

  1. The ABCs of TMJ Disorders: The Important Role of Assistants and Office Staff in Facilitating Treatment

 
Patients often share their concern about TMJ pain or dysfunction when scheduling their appointment or when they are first seated in the treatment room. The office staff and assistants should document these concerns using consistent and correct terminology and communicate these reports to the hygienist or dentist. Each office should have a “TMJ Disorder Protocol” for these patients to prevent any aggravation of existing TMJ problems and to educate the patient in self-management of these common disorders. The “ABC’s of TMJ” syllabus outlines a protocol and includes a tutorial for current and future staff members for the implementation of the educational objectives of this course.
 
At the conclusion of this course, attendees will be able to:
  • Converse with patients regarding TMJ disorders using correct terminology
  • Communicate patient’s TMJ related concerns to the treating hygienist or dentist
  • With a dentist’s direction, provide basic TMJ self-care and jaw exercise instructions to patients
  • Implement dental office strategies to prevent iatrogenic aggravation of the TMJ and related muscles

 

 2. They are Common and They are Treatable: Practical Guidelines for Managing TMJ Disorders

Nearly a third of all patients experience signs or symptoms related to TMJ disorders, but only about 20% of these patients require clinical intervention. The initial focus of therapy is to control pain and dysfunction and with the proper diagnosis this can usually be accomplished in a predictable and practical manner. The long-term treatment objective is to prevent recurrence or progression by identifying the perpetuating factors.  If the dental occlusion is a perpetuating factor, care must be taken to establish the stability of the temporomandibular joints before proceeding with complex occlusal therapy.

 
At the conclusion of this course, attendees will be able to:
  • Identify and categorize TMJ disorders into diagnostic subgroups.
  • Understand the role of TMJ imaging in diagnosis and prognosis.
  • Correlate intraoral appliance selection with diagnostic subgroups.
  • Implement a treatment plan appropriate to the severity of the clinical findings.
  • Evaluate the appropriateness and timing of occlusal therapy in managing TMJ disorders.
Dr. James Howard received his DDS from the University of Washington in 1976 where he then completed a two year postdoctoral fellowship in the management of orofacial pain and TMJ disorders. During his 30 years of private practice he has treated over 13,000 patients on referral from dentists and physicians. This private practice experience has enabled him to develop a PRACTICAL APPROACH TO MANANGING TMJ DISORDERS that can be implemented in every dental office.  Jim has published in numerous dental and medical journals and has contributed textbook chapters. Dr. Howard is the Director of the Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Clinic in the Department of Dental Medicine at Children’s Regional Medical Center in Seattle.  While living in Seattle he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Washington School of Dentistry. Jim and his family moved to Spokane, Washington in 1996.