Graeme Milicich, BDS

 Graeme Milicich, BDS

Graeme Milicich, BDS

Thursday, April 8, 2010
1. 9 am – 12 pm
Recommended for: Dentists, Assistants
2. 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Recommended for: Dentists, Assistants
 
Friday, April 9, 2010
3. 9 am – 12 pm
Recommended for: Dentists, Hygienists, Assistants
4. 2 pm – 5 pm
Recommended for: Dentists, Hygienists, Assistants
 
3 CE Credits each course
ODA Courses

  

 
1. Lasers in General Dentistry. Hype or Reality?
 
Since the early use of lasers in dentistry over 25 years ago, the science and technology have advanced significantly. This presentation will cover the basics of dental laser physics and the clinical application of lasers in general practice. Once the physics of laser /tissue interactions are understood, the clinical applications only become limited by your imagination. Hard tissue lasers have significant contributions to make in the fields of restorative and cosmetic dentistry, soft tissue management, implants, periodontics, endodontics and surgery. It is all about improving the quality of the service delivery to our patients as well and improving the clinical outcomes. Dr Milicich has conducted extensive research into hard tissue laser ablation and the effective use of lasers in endodontics utilizing modified techniques associated with photo-acoustic effects within the root canal. The results have led to improvements and simplification of clinical techniques and clinical outcomes.
 
Course Objectives:
  • Understand simple laser physics as it applies to the clinical situation
  • Learn the relationship between the laser hard tissue interaction and how this effects ablation rates
  • Become familiar with the concept of end cutting devices and the difference with rotary cutting
  • Learn about the concept of focused and defocused ablation and how this can create different effects on the target tissue
  • Learn how understanding the concept of the clinically observable ablation threshold simplifies learning how to use a laser
  • Learn about the multiple applications of laser technology and how this can impact on your practice.
  • The advanced application of lasers in endodontics
  • Lasers in periodontics for the general practitioner
2. Posterior Restorations Made Simple: Direct Composites and Direct Porcelain
 
There are now a plethora of restorative options available to the profession to help restore function and appearance following the ravages of caries. Many patients are now not giving us the option of using amalgam. If we understand and follow some simple, basic principles, posterior composite restorations can be effective and predictable and CADCAM restorations can step in once the limits of Composites have been reached.
Confused about C-Factor? Using simple graphics, the role of C-Factor and composite shrinkage in post-insertion sensitivity will be explained along with restorative techniques, using different materials including self-etching resins and self-etching glass ionomers and how to combine them effectively.
Resin sealants getting recurrent caries? Understanding how GIC works, how GICs bond to tooth structure provides an effective solution. Dr Milicich has conducted both SEM and clinical research into the GIC-tooth interface and how this impacts on clinical outcomes. The rationale behind various clinical applications and the specific techniques for GIC sealants, internal remineralization techniques and various GIC-composite sandwich techniques will be addressed to improve the predictability of restorative techniques. 
 
Course Objectives:
  • Learn about the acid resistant chemically fused glass ionomer bond
  • How GICs prevent post insertion sensitivity
  • Learn about C-Factor and controlling composite shrinkage vectors
  • Learn how to place predictable glass ionomer fissure sealants based on 7 yrs of clinical research
  • Understand the clinical applications of different types of GICs
  • Learn about internal remineralization and how this is achieved, including details of the clinical procedure
  • Learn about the composite-GIC sandwich technique and how it controls post insertion sensitivity
  • Controlling contact points to prevent food impaction
  • Conservation of vital tooth structure using CADCAM restorations
3. Caries – Help, the House is on Fire!
 
What would dentistry look like if caries did not exist? Our profession has been striving for the past century to reduce the ravages of this disease with minimal success. Recent research indicates there is a rise in caries incidence in many sections of our community. As a profession, why are we struggling to manage this disease? Many of our current caries diagnostic and management protocols have been focused around a simplistic model of the disease and it is obvious we can’t simply brush and floss this disease away and simply filling cavities is not treating caries. The advent of concepts like caries management by risk assessment (CaMBRA) and an ever expanding understanding of the Biofilm disease model have lead to a rethink on how to successfully manage the disease. Bludgeoning Mother Nature into submission has proven to be unsuccessful and the successes of emerging strategies, treatment concepts and materials show the current rethink has significantly improved clinical outcomes for our patients.
 
Course Objectives:
  • What is a biofilm and what is its significance?
  • The significance of a multispecies biofilm disease model
  • What is a healthy versus a diseased biofilm?
  • Diagnosing a diseased biofilm in 30 seconds
  • Disease risk factors
  • Strategic advice for patients to help them control their disease
  • Treatment modalities to convert a diseased biofilm back to health and helping it stay that way
4. Minimal Invasion, Maximum Intervention
 
There comes a point is the management of caries, where dental damage and cavitation begin to occur. Cavities are not caries, they are simply the signs and symptoms of an uncontrolled biofilm disease. Diagnostic and treatment options are many and varied but the information they provide has to also be related to the patient’s caries risk profile. The goal is to reduce the frequency and severity of physical intervention into tooth structure. The structural integrity of a tooth is paramount to its long term survival, leading to the concept of minimal invasion of the integrity of the tooth, and maximal intervention during the early stages of the disease to prevent or minimize any damage and potentially repair or stabilize early damage without cutting the tooth. Once physical intervention is required, the goal is to contain the damage and maintain important dental anatomical structures critical to the stability of the tooth
 
Course Objectives:
  • Learn new dental anatomy like the peripheral rim of enamel, the sub-occlusal oblique transverse ridge and the maxillary enamel web
  • How these structures impact on biomechanical function
  • How these structures modify current cavity designs to improve tooth and restoration longevity
  • How does caries detection dye really work?
  • Understand the accurate use of the DIAGNOdent and what it is really telling us
  • How is this applied to accurate tooth removal using various technologies like lasers, air-abrasion and micro-burs.
  • Learn why resins sometimes don’t stick to the tooth, particularly in fissures
  • What is the solution to unpredictable resin sealant performance?
  • Understand the demineralization/remineralization cycle and how to remineralize early white spot lesions
Dr. Graeme Milicich, NZ, lectures on minimal intervention, caries risk assessment/management, minimal intervention restorative techniques, physics and clinical applications of hard-soft tissue lasers, and E4D/CADCAM. He is a Diplomate and founding board member of WCMID, Master of the WCLI, founding Board member and honorary lifetime member of the NZIMID and recipient of WCMID Clinician of the Year Award, and WCMID Clinical Research Award. Dr Milicich has researched on the physics of Er:Cr:YSGG laser ablation and associated clinical applications. He has published internationally, and has CDs covering minimal intervention, restorative techniques, caries risk assessment/management, posterior composites, and clinical applications of Er:Cr:YSGG lasers.