James Engum

 James Engum

James Engum

Saturday, April 4, 2009
1 pm - 4:30 pm
3 CE credits
ODA course
Recommended for: Dental Team
 

 

 

 

Strength Training Doesn't Need to be a Way of Life:
How to Meet Your Goals Without Becoming an Iron Head

My goal is to give a clear presentation of some of the core principles of all strength training philosophies as well as those which are unique to High Intensity Training and to provide some instruction and demonstrations of techniques that can be used at home or at a gym. My hope is that when we are finished, attendees will understand that when it comes to physical training, especially strength training, it is the quality of effort that counts more than the quantity. This can be hard to grasp, since in our culture more is usually perceived as better.

The core principles that we will cover include the Overload Principle, SAID Principle and the General Adaptation Syndrome. The last of which provides a nice segue to the introduction of High Intensity Training. We will briefly cover the origins of HIT and some of the figures who have contributed to the philosophy over the years.
 
Next, we will discuss some of the different schools of thought that have emerged within the High Intensity community and the rationale for those versions of the practice. Then we get down to the nuts and bolts of how the training affects your body and why we choose the parameters of our particular version of HIT. During this portion of the presentation we will cover some of the theories of muscle fiber recruitment, our interpretation of the SAID Principle and methods for controlling variables in strength training.
 
In summary, we will provide some real life examples of our experience in using this philosophy with a wide spectrum of individuals and some of the philosophical implications of training in this style.
 
From here we will provide demonstrations and offer to run volunteers through a sample set of either the home versions or using our equipment. All of this is usually enough to incite a plethora of good questions, for which we will allot ample time.
 
In the end, I feel confident that we can provide a convincing argument that it really is possible to benefit from strength training without committing oneself to the “gym culture,” which usually demands a considerable amount of time and energy. More is not necessarily better.
 
 
James Engum has been a personal trainer for five years, and the owner of a personal training studio in Bend, OR for the last two. He and his team of trainers subscribe to a particular training method commonly referred to as High Intensity Training (HIT). They have refined the use of sound strength training principles to the point that their clients meet their strength training goals in only one session per week. This is Living Fitness’ second showing at the Oregon Dental Conference, and the team looks forward to building upon the first presentation with more examples of what you can do on your own or at a public facility as well as presenting their unique brand of HIT.